PRODUCT PROFILE

Latest Dublin Prices

NAME
LATEST
CHANGE
Aer Lingus 1.56 0.01 more
BoI 0.28 0.00 more
CRH 20.89 -0.09 more
Glanbia 10.55 -0.16 more
Greencore 0.64 -0.02 more
Ind. News 0.12 0.01 more
Ryanair 7.41 0.13 more

 

Abbott's Irish heart test to save lives

Wednesday, December 18 12:18:17

A new diagnostic test, developed by global healthcare company, Abbott's Longford-based team, may help doctors more accurately identify heart attacks in women and save lives in a situation where every minute counts.

Its ARCHITECT STAT High Sensitive Troponin-I (hsTnl) assay could allow doctors to reduce the time to diagnosis and treatment by several hours when compared to standard troponin tests, Abbott said.

Promising preliminary results from a recent study also suggest that Abbott's hsTnI test may help doctors improve the diagnosis and prognosis of patients presenting with symptoms of a heart attack, 2 which could be particularly beneficial for women, who are often under-diagnosed.3, it said.

The ARCHITECT STAT hsTnI test will be used initially at the Mater Misericordiae University and Mater Private Hospitals, Dublin, and it is anticipated that it will be subsequently adopted at other key cardiology centres throughout Ireland.

The preferred biomarker used to identify suspected heart attacks is cardiac troponin, a protein found in the heart muscle.4 Many patients who visit the emergency room with a suspected heart attack currently have blood samples drawn with troponin tests upon admission, after six hours, and then potentially 12 hours later, before a diagnosis may be made. For patients who are having a heart attack, early diagnosis is crucial. Once the heart stops receiving blood, heart muscle cells start to die and could lead to parts of the heart being irreversibly damaged.

Abbott's new hsTnI test can measure very low levels of the protein, which allows doctors to evaluate whether or not patients are having a heart attack within two to four hours. This faster evaluation could allow doctors to reduce the time to diagnosis and treatment by several hours when compared to standard troponin tests.

"Use of this test could speed up the process whereby patients with suspected acute coronary syndromes are evaluated. What this could means is that high-risk patients may be identified and treated at the earliest opportunity, but also that low-risk patients can be reassured and discharged. This has obvious benefits for both patient care and resource utilisation," said Dr. Niall Mahon, Consultant Cardiologist, Mater Misericordiae University and Mater Private Hospitals, Dublin.