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Ireland's biggest accountancy body unveils new student education programme

Written by Robert McHugh, on 27th Jun 2018. Posted in Financial

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Ireland’s biggest accountancy body, Chartered Accountants Ireland, this week announced the launch of a new education programme for its 6,665 students across the island.

The new programme seeks to address current market and employer needs, anticipate future skills requirements and puts additional supports in place for its student body. 
 
The programme will be available to Chartered Accountants Ireland students from October 2018 and represents the largest single reform of the Institute’s education offering in more than a decade. 
 
To coincide with this, the Institute has also launched a new, all-island advertising campaign to promote the career opportunities available for Chartered Accountants, new flexible routes to the qualification and the updated education programme. The advertising will run for the course of the summer on radio and digital formats and will be supported by open evening events in Dublin, Cork and Belfast.
 
Speaking today, Director of Education and Training, Ronan O’Loughlin said, "Education never stands still and our programmes must keep pace with the rapidly changing business environment, new technologies and student expectations. The new education programme does just that and will ensure that our members, Chartered Accountants, have the right blend of financial and technology skills and training to lead businesses into the future." 
 
Source: www.businessworld.ie 

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