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42% of workforce dissatisfied with their career

Written by Robert McHugh, on 23rd May 2019. Posted in Ireland

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New research has found that 42% of the Irish workforce have hit a career ceiling, feel frustrated or are in a toxic situation. This is according to new research from Harmonics, the Irish partner of OI Global Partners, from its Future Workforce Readiness Research Study.

The purpose of the study was to measure the preparedness of the workforce for the massive changes ahead in the new world of work. Over 500 working professionals from 21 countries worldwide participated in the study during spring 2019. The majority of respondents were from Ireland.

The research finds that 1 in 5 workers are actively seeking to leave their employers and pursue a new role externally. This was highest for males (24%) in the 35-44 age category and for females (23%) in the 45-54 age category.

When looking at comparisons between male and female respondents, the study noted that 34 is the age when the career growth trajectory declines for women. In the 25-34 age category, 38% of female respondents described themselves in a career growth stage. This drops to 31% in the 35-44 age category and lower again to 22% in the 45 – 54 category.

The study also observed that females identify themselves as having ‘Hit a Career Ceiling’ more so than their male counterparts for all these age bands.

Among the key findings of the survey, 64% is the average score for Future Career Readiness. However, when broken down, the results showed a clear disconnect between a persons perceptions of their future career readiness versus their actual level of readiness.The key theme emerging is a lack of readiness to take advantage of workplace change that is happening now.

Commenting on the research, Managing Director of Harmonics and author of the research study, John Fitzgerald said, "People think they are better prepared than they actually are. While they may be confident in their professional and personal development, the busyness of daily work tasks and lack of longer-term planning may be leading to an over-confidence in their capability to succeed in the future of work. There was a distinct lack of preparation for the impact of AI and automation and awareness of how they can bridge the gap so they can stay ahead in their careers."

He added, "The speed of change in the global economy means employers are almost always in a restructuring and change mode. Plus, the rise of AI and automation is leading to new ways of working. For organisations, this means traditional workforce planning is no longer fit for purpose and job descriptions are in constant flux. For individuals, climbing the traditional career ladder no longer makes sense as a lifelong career strategy."

Source: www.businessworld.ie

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