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47% of Irish managers believe employees are at risk of burnout

Written by Robert McHugh, on 11th Aug 2020. Edited on 12th Aug 2020 Posted in Ireland

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Over a third (36%) of Irish employees stated that their mental health & wellbeing has suffered as result of working longer hours during Covid-19 and 47% of managers believe their employees may be at risk of burnout, following a change in work pattern or behaviour bought on by Covid-19.

The findings come from a new report published this week by global recruiter Robert Walters: Burning the Candle: Strategies to Combat Workplace Burnout. The survey was conducted in July (a good few months into lockdown/working-from-home). It was a global survey taking place across 31 countries with 1,000 Irish professionals taking part and 250 Irish companies.

Those working remotely recorded a 35% increase in productivity, and an overwhelming 87% of these respondents have felt the pressure to keep productivity levels consistently high to prove the case for working from home post-Covid.

Whilst two thirds of Irish professionals (61%) believe that wellness policies are important, just a third of companies offer what is required by law. Since remote working began, 21% of Irish professionals claim that the pressure to deliver results has caused a negative impact on their mental health or wellbeing.

Over a quarter of Irish professionals (26%) stated that more autonomy whilst remote working was a key factor in their increased productivity. When asked about expectations for the future of work, 29% stated that they would like more autonomy and trust given by the management team.

Commenting on the research, Director at Robert Walters Ireland, Suzanne Feeney said, "Increasingly we were seeing offices be re-designed ergonomically, work health insurances enhanced to provide mental health support, and training provided to managers to help understand and deal with employees suffering from poor mental health. Many of these policies were geared around personal mental health issues – such as depression and anxiety – which have an impact or were exasperated by work."

She added, "Burnout is an entirely different and recently recognised condition which, unlike other mental health issues, can be directly linked to work. As a result, employers have a crucial and central role to play in order to ensure their staff do not reach the point of burnout."

Source: www.businessworld.ie

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