Home > Ireland > Frequently changing jobs viewed negatively by Irish employers

Frequently changing jobs viewed negatively by Irish employers

Written by Robert McHugh, on 17th Jan 2019. Posted in Ireland

article headline

Research conducted by global job site Indeed has shown that “job hopping” has the potential to damage career progression, with just under two thirds (65%) of employers reporting that they have opted not to interview someone who has had short-tenure jobs in the past. Indeed surveyed both employers and employees in Ireland as part of this research. 

In seeking to define “job hopping”, on average employers consider 6 months to be a short-tenure to spend in a job, and employees consider 11 months a short period of time. In the minds of most employers, having four short tenure jobs on their CV would qualify a candidate as a job hopper, although 44% feel that three such roles would.

While many employees surveyed agreed that job hopping may be viewed as disloyal, indecisive and a negative by recruiters and employers, only 29% felt that it would ultimately hurt their career, while 57% felt it wouldn’t really have any impact.

A small proportion (14%) felt that moving among various short tenure jobs was a positive for their career, presenting a chance to learn new skills, demonstrate their adaptability, boost their CV, and make connections to further their career.

Job hopping is more of a concern in smaller companies with less than 10 employees, with one in four such employers admitting to not interviewing a candidate for that reason. This compares to fewer than one in seven (13%) in companies with over 500 employees.

When asked what was an acceptable amount of time to stay in a job in order to contribute, gain experience and progress your career, employers and employees shared more common ground, with employers on average agreeing 16 months and employees 19-20 months. On average employers feel it’s acceptable for a candidate to change jobs 3 times in a 5-year period.

Finally, in an effort to understand what causes job hopping, respondents were asked about their reasons for leaving roles after a short period of time. An unhappy workplace is the main reason (4 in 10 respondents), and this proved to be a more significant factor for women (44% compared to 36% of men.) The second most popular reason for leaving a role prematurely was the offer of a better role with another company.

Commenting on the research, Indeed’s VP EMEA, Chris McDonald said, "It's important though that candidates can readily demonstrate the experience they have accrued by job-hopping, such as emotional intelligence to adapt to new environments and personalities, a broader understanding of a variety of sectors, and innovative skills and ideas. This will demonstrate a more strategic approach on the candidate’s side, rather than portraying something more negative such as a lack of commitment."

Source: www.businessworld.ie

More articles from Ireland

image Description

Irish Government says no-deal Brexit would be "crazy outcome"

Read more
image Description

Almost half of Irish homes bought with cash in 2018

Read more
image Description

Irish economy is the most vulnerable of remaining EU members to a disruptive brexit

Read more
image Description

Ireland under pressure over border plans for no-deal Brexit

Read more
image Description

Irish consumer spending flat in January

Read more