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Irish business prioritising talent retention

Written by Robert McHugh, on 25th Apr 2017. Posted in Ireland

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Four in five organisations have experienced skills shortages in the past two years and are now increasing development opportunities (57%) and upskilling the workforce (63%) to help grow their talent pipeline.

Furthermore, attracting and retaining talent is the top priority for Irish business over the next two years, according to research from CIPD Ireland, the professional body for HR and people development.

Research from CIPD Ireland in March 2017 on pay trends showed that in 2016, a third of employers made a counter-offer when an employee stated their intention to resign and 38% agreed there was a likelihood for additional pay increases for specific groups/ individuals.

The research shows a gap between the aspiration of how people should be treated at work and what leaders do in practice. When asked “Should people have a say in what happens then at work?”,  two-thirds of HR and business leaders  (66%) believed it was the right thing to do, but only one in four (24%) said they always apply the principle. 

These will be just some of the issues discussed as CIPD Ireland meets for its annual conference on ‘Shaping the Future of Work’ on 25 April 2017, which will also look how to use change to create more innovative workplaces, the appropriate role of technology and how to make more ethical decisions.

At the CIPD Ireland Annual Conference, Paulo Gallo of the World Economic Forum addresses responsible leadership and the need for a strong moral compass. As part of shaping a future of work that is principled and builds trust, the CIPD will launch a set of principles to help guide good decisions in the workplace, especially needed when there are no obvious solutions or precedents.

Commenting on the research, Director of CIPD Ireland, Mary Connaughton said, "All these changes mean investing more in developing organisations and people, and supporting individuals to learn and earn throughout their life. Having workplace in Ireland future-fit means getting the government to support accredited learning throughout life including when people have left formal education; to examine alternative income mechanisms, such as the universal basic income to deal with more unstructured and insecure work patterns; and to take action to address Ireland’s looming pension crisis."

Source: www.businessworld.ie

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