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Limerick records 43% increase in job vacancies

Written by Robert McHugh, on 31st Oct 2017. Posted in Ireland

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IrishJobs.ie has today released its latest Jobs Index which shows that job vacancies are up 3% overall with Dublin (9%), Galway (16%) and Cork (1%) recording year on year (YoY) growth.  
 
The third quarter 2017 IrishJobs.ie Jobs Index utilises a dataset comprising of all corporate jobs advertised on IrishJobs.ie and Jobs.ie from 01/07/2017 to 30/09/2017.
 
The index shows that hospitality accounted for the largest share of job vacancies (14%) in the third quarter 2017, followed by banking and finance (10%), sales (9%) and tech (8%). Job vacancies in STEM sectors (science, pharmaceuticals, and food) up by 15%

Limerick is one of Ireland’s top performers in terms of new business growth. In the third quarter 2017, the increasingly popular county posted a 43% increase in job vacancies on the same period last year and 22% on the second quarter 2017,

Limerick has suffered from some of the highest rates of unemployment in recent years, but is now home to a number of thriving industries, including pharma and engineering. Major employers including Northern Trust and Regeneron have both expanded their operations and in further good news for the county, the Government recently announced the M20 motorway connecting Cork with Shannon via Limerick.
 
Commenting on the data, General Manager of IrishJobs.ie, Orla Moran said, "Although we have yet to feel the real impact, the spectre of Brexit also looms large and the slow pace of UK-EU negotiations may be lulling businesses into a false sense of security.  If the UK crashes out of the EU without a deal, Ireland will bear the brunt of the damage. A hard Brexit will likely lead to tariffs, taxes, border checks, supply chain disruption—all of which threatens economic growth in Ireland and, ultimately, job creation.  In other words, many Irish employers are understandably cautious of committing to new recruitment until the macro-landscape becomes a little clearer."

She added, "If Ireland can court some of the UK-based multinationals planning to leave the country after Brexit, we could benefit from an influx of new highly skilled jobs in tech and finance. Of course, this process will take time, and there will be no overnight successes."

Source: www.businessworld.ie

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