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New research on pay for Irish small companies

Written by Robert McHugh, on 20th Feb 2017. Posted in Ireland

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The Small Firms Association has today released research on the Pay and Conditions of employment in 576 small companies (with less than 50 employees drawn from manufacturing, distribution, retail and services), employing 12,903 employees.

The research found that the average rates of basic pay varied from €429 per week (Care Assistant) to €767 per week (Electrician). The respective range for salaried employees was €25,350 per annum (Junior Technician) to €89,616 per annum (Software Development Manager).    
 
The six largest job title responses in the survey had the following rates of pay:
Office Administrator €30,057 
Financial Accountant €51,523
Sales Executive €41,590
Marketing Executive €37,476
Unskilled Operative €29,013
Skilled Operative €32,245

 
The research shows that 34% of small companies supplemented maternity benefits above Social Welfare payments and 65% of small firm employees are covered by a company or occupational pension scheme.

Furthermore, 42% have medical health insurance schemes in place for employees and 56% of firms have formal flexible working arrangements in place (part-time working; home working/teleworking; flexitime and job share.)
 
Commenting on the results SFA Director, Patricia Callan says, "What is noticeable is the shift towards improving conditions of employment and other benefits rather than across the board pay rises.  Most pay increases are productivity related and there is a notable increase in the percentage of companies offering non-pay benefits to employees such as sick pay, pension and health insurance schemes and top-up leave entitlements."

She added, "The survey clearly indicates that employers have realised the benefits of assessing the overall remuneration package on offer, investing in employees through training opportunities, and meeting their requests for flexible working, rather than just increasing basic pay in order to retain and recruit top talent."

Source: www.businessworld.ie

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