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Maxim Integrated opens new Design Centre in Dublin

Written by Robert McHugh, on 20th Feb 2020. Posted in Technology

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It was announced yesterday that Maxim Integrated Products has opened a new design centre in Dublin.

The design center will focus on product development and conducting research and development in the areas of analog semiconductor design to deliver Maxim’s solutions across many end markets.

Maxim Integrated will recruit a team of mixed-signal and analog design engineers at this facility. The $25m investment will be primarily geared towards recruiting talent, equipment and building costs, as well as research and development. Located on the south side of Dublin, this is Maxim’s seventh design centre located in Europe.

Maxim Integrated develops analog and mixed-signal products and technologies to make systems smaller and smarter, with enhanced security and increased energy efficiency. The company aims to empower design innovation for automotive, industrial, healthcare, mobile consumer and cloud data center customers to deliver solutions.

"With our rich history and depth of talent, I’m thrilled that Maxim Integrated has chosen Dublin for this important investment," said John Kirwan, Vice President of Global Customer Operations at Maxim Integrated. "We encourage collaboration between employees representing a wealth of diverse, global experiences, from recent graduates of local universities to veteran designers who have been in the industry for many years."

Source: www.businessworld.ie

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